Teaching

These courses are regularly taught at UC Berkeley by Greg. For the current course schedule, visit the Berkeley Academic Guide.

Art Practice 23AC: Data Arts

Collect, display, and engage with Data in creative ways!

In conjuction with novel UC Online course offerings, Greg Niemeyer developed this course to engage in ethical questions about the collection, dissemination and analysis of personal and environmental data.

One of the first UC Berkeley courses to be offered online only via uconline, it emphasizes human experience as it leverages the unique online teaching format as a theme for the core question of the course: How do people form communities online, and how can these communities benefits from online data? This course relies heavily on the LTI suite of engagement tools called C-Suite, which Niemeyer developed in collaboration with John Scott and ETS.

Art Practice 178: Game Design Methods

Hands-on game design course based on Indie Game culture.

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Art Practice 174: Music and Image

Waves, both accoustic and luminous, come together in music video production.

GIF (Graphical Interchange Format) animations are the street art of the internet and the twitchings of our collective subconsious. Archive.org stores such gif animations in the millions so that future generations won't miss a single frame of the history of human consciousness as it emerged on the backlit glow of the browser nation. gifCollider, A public show of Niemeyer's attempt to digest this history ran from Oct. 25 to Oct. 28, 2016, at BAMPFA. The project was a collaboration with Olya Dubatova, Brewster Kahle, archive.org and many others. It now continues at the Magnes Museum for Jewish Art and Life exhibition "The Power of Attention" , Berkeley CA, with "Night Vision", a version of gifCollider based on Zechariah 4.1. It will be on display through 2017.

Click above to see and hear gifCollider Chapter 11, with music by Greg Niemeyer and Francesco Spagnolo.

Click above to see and hear gifCollider Chapter 06, with music by Paz Lenchantin.

Art Practice 294: Graduate Critique Seminar

Why so critical? Our MFA program is built on passion, inspiration, reflection, and execution.

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Art Practice 198: Independent Studies

If you want to spend a semester researching one specific topic in close collaboration, this is the course for that.

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Service

Universities are self-governed, therefore faculty engage in a wide range of services.

Berkeley Center for New Media

Interdisciplinary Center for Media Innovation

The Berkeley Center for New Media (BCNM) is a focal point for research and teaching about media innovation, led by a highly trans-disciplinary community of 120 affiliated faculty, advisors, and scholars from 35 UC Berkeley departments, including Architecture, Philosophy, Film & Media, History of Art, Performance Studies, and Music; the Schools of Engineering, Information, Journalism, and Law; and the Berkeley Art Museum. Founded in 2007 by a small group of faculty including Greg Niemeyer, Ken Goldberg, Linda Williams and others, BCNM is located at a global center for design and information technology and based in a public research university known for alternative thinking.

The BCNM mission is to critically analyze and help shape developments in new media from cross-disciplinary and global perspectives that emphasize humanities and the public interest. All media (Latin for “middle elements”) facilitate transformation: by definition, media are transformative. From the stone tablet to the printing press to the internet, media have become increasingly reconfigurable. The value of a medium is often related to its capacity for reconfiguration. To claim a medium as “new” is to posit a meaningful departure from the services of prior media. Thus new media are highly reconfigurable and doubly transformative: they achieve a transformation of prior modes of transformation. While new media often produce new perceptions, new behaviors, and new insights, they remain deeply rooted in powerful aesthetic, cultural, and political forces. As media transform, they often distort. Sophocles observed that “nothing vast enters the life of mortals without a curse.” BCNM actively engages scholars who critically examine the opportunities and risks associated with new media and who consider how new media can constructively benefit education, political engagement, privacy, and aesthetic experience. BCNM catalyzes research, educates future leaders, and facilitates public discourse through courses, lectures, symposia, and special events. BCNM has established cross-disciplinary faculty positions and a special program for masters’ and Ph.D. students. The BCNM supports academic modes of scholarship while encouraging unorthodox artworks, designs, and experiments. By reaching out to students, researchers, industry figures, and the broader public, BCNM stimulates new perspectives on contemporary new media. Greg Niemeyer directed BCNM from 2013 to 2016, and remains an active board member.

C-Suite Learning Tools Innovation

Quantitative Tools for Qualitative Learning

In conjuction with novel UC Online course offerings, Greg Niemeyer developed a new course engaging ethical questions about the collection, dissemination and analysis of personal and environmental data. One of the first UC Berkeley courses to be offered online only via uconline, it emphasizes human expereience over efficiency as it leverages the unique online teahcing format as a theme for the core question of the course: How do people form communities online, and who benefits from online data.

Digital Media Labs Consortium

Sharing Resources, Eliminating Departmental Boundaries

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